What is CBG?

CBG is short for cannabigerol.

It’s a compound made by the cannabis plant.

CBG is non-intoxicating.

It won’t make you feel “high.”

CBG won’t cause you to fail a drug test.

CBG is much talked about right now because it has significant body and mood-altering benefits.

 

 

CBG Health Benefits

CBG has health benefits for:

  • specific types of cancer (3)
  • inflammatory bowel disease (4)
  • neuroprotective qualities (5)

CBG health benefits have started a race within the medical community to understand this new compound’s exact method of action.

 

cannabigerol price demand study

 

 

CBG Mood-Altering Effects

CBG helps with different types of anxiety and anxiety disorders. (1)


cbg anxiolytic benefits

Interested in cannabinoid effects on anxiety disorders? Check out this guide to CBD’s scientifically backed anxiety benefits.

 

CBG Pain Benefits

According to the medical study below, CBG helps with difficult to treat pain and may be an effective muscle relaxer. (2)

cbg analgesic benefits

 

 

CBG Price And Availability

In farming communities, breeders are carefully working to increase the CBG content of their cannabis strains.

New strains with higher CBG yields will increase the availability of CBG and bring down the price at retail. (6)

According to Forbes, demand has been so high that retailers can’t keep quality CBG flower in stock.

cbg for sale

Consumer interest in CBG is turning into something of a phenomenon.

CBG’s popularity is a result of its strong effects on anxiety, pain, and inflammation.

How can you tailor CBG to meet your needs?

Let’s find out below.

Quick Science: CBG Chemistry

CBG is known as the “mother of all cannabinoids.”

That’s because other cannabinoids in the cannabis plant start out as CBGA (CBG’s acid form).

CBD and even THC start out as the compound CBGA.

As the hemp plant matures, most of the plant’s CBGA gets transformed into these other cannabinoids prior to harvest. (7)

 

cannabinoid chemistry cbga

 

By the time this natural conversion process within the plant is over, only about 1% of the original CBGA is left.  The rest has been converted into one of the many other types of cannabinoids produced by the cannabis plant. (8)

 

hemp cannabigerol chemistry

 

That’s it — no more chemistry for the rest of this guide.

Types of CBG

Different types of CBG available:

  • CBG flower (CBG bud)
  • CBG tincture (extract)
  • CBG oil (extract)
  • CBG wax (concentrate)
  • CBG cream (topical)
  • CBG capsules

CBG Benefits

After years of prohibition, CBG research is finally in the fast lane.

New studies are being published and multiple getting underway.

While some of CBG’s benefits are known, exactly how CBG works is not fully understood. (10)

 

cannabigerol benefit mechanism action

 

For decades, CBG anxiety benefits, pain-relieving properties, and inflammation effects were not studied.

Cannabis prohibition caused many medical researchers to focus on more profitable, hassle-free compounds.

Decades of cannabis cultivation prohibition made it nearly impossible for universities to attain quality CBG samples.

Since the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, there has been a profound change.

Below is a 2019 press release by the National Institutes of Health.

It announces a new effort to study cannabinoids like CBG for their health benefits.

cannabigerol pain relief benefit

New research is published frequently.

Stay up-to-date on recent cannabinoid medical results right here.

New Studies Started in 2020

Universities and NIH researchers are moving quickly to capitalize on the health benefits of CBG.

16 new CBG medical studies were started in 2020 alone.

CBG For Pain

CBG appears to relieve pain better than THC.

CBG may be an excellent muscle relaxer as well. (11)

 

cannabigerol muscle relaxer

Using CBG for pain-relief decreases the use of opioid abuse.

CBG is a powerful compound with pain and inflammation benefits.

Unlike opioids, CBG is:

  • not habit-forming
  • not intoxicating
  • not addictive
  • not a depressive
  • not a compound that causes constipation

While many drugs exist for treating pain and muscle spasms, many have potentially severe adverse effects.

The dangerous and addictive nature of opioid-based pain medications makes them a high-risk option for pain relief.

cbg health benefits

CBG may be a better option.

CBG has minimal adverse effects, especially when compared to opioid treatments.

Interested in knowing of the science behind cannabinoid pain relief?  Check out this guide to CBD pain relief.

guide to cannabidiol benefits for pain based on 2020 medical studies

 

CBG Colon Cancer Effects

A 2014 study published in Carcinogenesis demonstrated CBG can inhibit or slow the growth of some colon cancer tumors. (12)

 

cannabigerol cancer benefits

101,420 people were diagnosed with colon cancer in 2018 making it a leading cause of cancer in the U.S. (13)

cannabigerol colon cancer benefits

According to the study, CBG  is “a safe non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid able to block TRPM8 channels, exerts pro-apoptotic effects in CRC cells as well as chemopreventive (AOM model) and curative (xenograft model) actions in experimental models of colon cancer in Vivo.”

To be sure, CBG is far from being a treatment for cancer but it does show a promise which calls for further research.

CBG For Inflammation

Medical studies show that cannabigerol (CBG) has unexpected neurological benefits resulting from its anti-inflammatory properties. (14)

 

cannabigerol dementia alzheimers protection

 

Additionally, CBG benefits gut inflammation diseases (IBS) such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. (15)

 

cbg inflammatory bowel disease benefits

 

Promising research from 2018 shows CBG may help with the chronic model of multiple sclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. (16)

cbg neurodegenerative multiple sclerosis therapeutic

CBG has significant anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

These effects may act as a neuroprotectant against diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s. (17)

cannabinoid dementia alzheimers benefits

 

CBG Glaucoma Benefits

Cannabinoids such as CBG and CBD can lower intraocular pressure related to glaucoma. (18)


cbg glaucoma therapy

As with many cannabinoid benefits, CBG’s mechanism of action is not fully understood. (19)

 

cannabinoid glaucoma benefits

 

It may be the case CBG is able to relax veinous pressure and increase blood circulation to the eye. (20)

 

cannabigerol ocular pressure

 

Smoking marijuana is not medically recommended for treating glaucoma systemically.

CBG can be consumed orally, topically, or as a combustion-free dab wax to decrease symptoms of increased intraocular pressure.

Not familiar to dabbing? Dabbing CBG wax or rosin is  394% more efficient than smoking a cannabis joint.  See the study.

CBG for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is the result of chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.

 

Crohn’s Disease

cannabigerol inflammatory bowel disease benefits

Ulcerative Colitis

cbg inflammatory bowel disease benefits

People have been using cannabis and CBG for hundreds of years to treat inflammatory bowel disease. (21)

 

cbg gastrointestinal inflammation

 

Since the 1990s, patients have described achieving remission of inflammatory bowel disease using medical cannabis. (22)

 

medical cannabis IBD treatment

 

This research from February of 2017 describes the anti-inflammatory properties of cannabinoids.  CBG may be helpful for relieving ulcerative colitis. (23)

 

cbg colitis preventive

 

Another promising study looked at the greater endocannabinoid system’s effects on colitis.   The study noted that cannabigerol may be particularly helpful with certain models of Crohn’s Disease. (24)

 

 

cbg crohns benefits

 

The 2013 study below suggests CBG may be considered for clinical trials as a treatment for inflammatory bowel disease. (25)

cannabinoid inflammatory bowel disease therapeutic benefits

 

Interested in learning more about cannabinoid benefits for IBD?  Check out this guide based on 2020 studies.

 

 

Where Is CBG For Sale?

You can find CBG for sale online as well as in dispensaries and neighborhood CBD shops.

CBG isolate is sold online and frequently added to tinctures and oil.

 

 

CBG Entourage Effect

Blending CBG with terpenes can amplify and target the effects of both CBG and terpenes.

Terpene health benefits are frequently complementary CBG. 

cbg booster terpenes

Terpenes interact with cannabinoids in the body to boost the effects of compounds like CBG.  (26)

This interaction is called the “entourage effect.”

 

cbg entourage effects terpenes

 

Consuming full spectrum CBG with the right terpenes maximizes and extends the effects of both compounds. (27)

 

 

cannabigerol terpene benefits

 

CBG Wax

CBG wax is a full-spectrum cannabinoid concentrate that is dabbed or added to a meal.

CBG wax and rosins are an especially good source of full-spectrum CBG and terpenes.

This is a video of cannabis being pressed in CBG live rosin.

Live rosin is a particularly rich source of cannabis terpenes.

https://youtu.be/0hMyCjtleIE

 

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 How Does CBG Work?

“How can one compound have such varied benefits?”

The answer: CBG affects your body’s endocannabinoid system.

You can find the most in-depth information about the endocannabinoid system in this scientific CBD guide here.

endocannabinoid properties

Both CBD and CBG interact with the endocannabinoid system in different ways.

Endocannabinoid System

Your endocannabinoid system is a vital part of your nervous system.

It’s a critical regulatory system responsible for maintaining your body and mind in constant balance.

Your endocannabinoid system uses endogenous cannabinoids (cannabinoids made in your body) to send regulatory signals to different parts of your body.

Cannabinoids like CBG mimic these chemicals.

So, by consuming cannabinoids of different types (like CBG) you are effecting the signaling within your nervous system.

That, in turn, controls the homeostasis (regulatory balance) in your brain and body.

In general, that’s the key to why cannabinoids have such far-reaching benefits.

Roughly speaking, cannabinoids give you the power to adjust the functioning regulatory systems in your body that may be out of balance.

 

anxiety emotional balance

Your endocannabinoid system regulates has far-reaching regulatory responsibilities.

It regulates:

  • anxiety
  • immune system response
  • fertility
  • mood
  • appetite
  • pain sensation
  • memory (formation and destruction)
  • sleep
  • muscle recovery
  • stress response
  • inflammation

…and that’s just some of what we know about today. (28)

The endocannabinoid system was discovered in 1992.

It affects and maintains the good health of your mind and body. (29)

 

fertility inflammation pain

 

It has been said that 95% of doctors weren’t taught about this important system while in medical school.

Unfortunately, it is still poorly understood today.

It’s up to you to educate yourself about the effects of your endocannabinoid system (ECS).

Knowing about your ECS will put you in more control of your own health and how you feel.

Phytocannabinoids

As we just learned, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is part of your body’s nervous system.

It is located in your brain, spine, and throughout your body. (30)

 

natural homeostasis systems

 

Unfortunately, the endocannabinoid system is still poorly understood by medical science. (31)

 

endocannabinoid system functioning

 

Though relatively new, it is known that the ECS has a critical role in maintaining good health.

Your ECS naturally uses cannabinoids as a way of sending regulatory signals.

Phytocannabinoids (plant cannabinoids) from like CBG mimic the cannabinoids created by your body. (32)

cannabigerol endocannabinoid benefits

 

In fact, phytocannabinoids like CBG and CBN are so similar to the endogenous cannabinoids created by your endocannabinoid system that your body reacts to phytocannabinoids as if it made them itself. (33)

 

cannabigerol health effects

 

That’s the secret to the health benefits of CBG and CBD–they act just like the regulatory chemicals your own body makes.

That’s why they’re so powerful and effective.

So the answer to the question, “how can one compound have such varied health benefits?”

It affects the functioning of the powerful endocannabinoid system.

In doing so, CBG effects the functioning of multiple regulatory systems throughout the body.

 

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CBG Side Effects

CBG is generally well-tolerated and adverse effects are thought to be minimal.

Some consumers report limited sensations of tiredness and drowsiness with a potential loss of appetite.

As with any cannabinoid, you may have reactions that are a result of your body’s unique chemistry.

This is completely natural.

Start off slowly and see how your body responds to CBG. 

Increase or decrease your CBG dosage as you feel comfortable and stop if you start to exhibit adverse effects.

 

CBG Dosage

Check out this video by Dr. Liptan on how to find the right CBD dosage for you.  Many of the same principles apply to finding your best CBG dosage.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E98emmt63fs&feature=emb_title

 

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References

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  2. Russo EB. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2008;4(1):245–259. doi:10.2147/tcrm.s1928
  3. Francesca Borrelli, Ester Pagano, Barbara Romano, Stefania Panzera, Francesco Maiello, Diana Coppola, Luciano De Petrocellis, Lorena Buono, Pierangelo Orlando, Angelo A. Izzo, Colon carcinogenesis is inhibited by the TRPM8 antagonist cannabigerol, a Cannabis-derived non-psychotropic cannabinoid, Carcinogenesis, Volume 35, Issue 12, December 2014, Pages 2787–2797, https://doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgu205
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